Workshop Repair and Service Manuals GMC SIERRA
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Driving Information

Truck-Camper Loading Information      A vehicle-specific Truck-Camper Loading Information label is attached to the inside of the vehicle's glove box. This label indicates if a slide-in camper can be carried, how much of a load the vehicle can carry, and how to...
Tire and Loading Information Label      Label Example A vehicle specific Tire and Loading Information label is attached to the center pillar (B-pillar). With the driver door open, you will find the label attached below the door lock post (striker). The tire...
Steps for Determining Correct Load Limit      1. Locate the statement “The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed XXX kg or XXX lbs” on your vehicle's placard. 2. Determine the combined weight of the driver and passengers that will be riding in your...
Recovery Hooks      WARNING Never pull on recovery hooks from the side. The hooks could break and you and others could be injured. When using recovery hooks, always pull the vehicle straight out. Notice: Never use recovery hooks to...
Off-Road Recovery      The vehicle's right wheels can drop off the edge of a road onto the shoulder while driving. Follow these tips: 1. Ease off the accelerator and then, if there is nothing in the way, steer the vehicle so that it...
Loading Points      A. Primary Load Points B. Secondary Load Areas C. Cargo Management Option Holes Structural members (A) and (B) are included in the pick-up box design. Additional accessories should use these load points....
Certification/Tire Label      Certification/Tire Label A vehicle specific Certification/ Tire label is found on the rear edge of the driver door. The label shows the size of your vehicle's original tires and the inflation pressures needed to...
Add-On Equipment      When you carry removable items, you may need to put a limit on how many people you carry inside your vehicle. Be sure to weigh your vehicle before you buy and install the new equipment. Notice: Overloading the vehicle may...
Two-Tiered Loading      Depending on the model of your pick-up, an upper load platform can be created by positioning three or four 5 cm (2 inches) by 15 cm (6 inches) wooden planks across the width of the pickup box. The planks must be inserted in...
Vehicle Load Limits      It is very important to know how much weight your vehicle can carry. This weight is called the vehicle capacity weight and includes the weight of all occupants, cargo, and all nonfactory-installed options. Two labels on...
Rocking Your Vehicle to Get It Out      Turn the steering wheel left and right to clear the area around the front wheels. For four-wheel-drive vehicles, shift into Four-Wheel High. For vehicles with StabiliTrak®, turn the traction control part of the system off....
If the Vehicle Is Stuck      Slowly and cautiously spin the wheels to free the vehicle when stuck in sand, mud, ice, or snow. See “Rocking Your Vehicle to Get It Out” later in this section. If the vehicle has a traction system, it can often help to...
Blizzard Conditions      Being stuck in snow can be a serious situation. Stay with the vehicle unless there is help nearby. If possible, use the Roadside Assistance Program (U.S. and Canada) on page 13?8 or Roadside Assistance Program (Mexico) on...
Driving on Snow or Ice      Drive carefully when there is snow or ice between the tires and the road, creating less traction or grip. Wet ice can occur at about 0°C (32°F) when freezing rain begins to fall, resulting in even less traction. Avoid...
Hill and Mountain Roads      Driving on steep hills or through mountains is different than driving on flat or rolling terrain. Tips for driving in these conditions include: • Keep the vehicle serviced and in good shape. • Check all fluid levels and...
Highway Hypnosis      Always be alert and pay attention to your surroundings while driving. If you become tired or sleepy, find a safe place to park the vehicle and rest. Other driving tips include: • Keep the vehicle well ventilated. •...
Other Rainy Weather Tips      Besides slowing down, other wet weather driving tips include: • Allow extra following distance. • Pass with caution. • Keep windshield wiping equipment in good shape. • Keep the windshield washer fluid reservoir...
Hydroplaning      Hydroplaning is dangerous. Water can build up under the vehicle's tires so they actually ride on the water. This can happen if the road is wet enough and you are going fast enough. When the vehicle is hydroplaning, it has...
Driving on Wet Roads      Rain and wet roads can reduce vehicle traction and affect your ability to stop and accelerate. Always drive slower in these types of driving conditions and avoid driving through large puddles and deep-standing or flowing...
After Off-Road Driving      Remove any brush or debris that has collected on the underbody or chassis, or under the hood. These accumulations can be a fire hazard. After operation in mud or sand, have the brake linings cleaned and checked. These...
Driving in Water      WARNING Driving through rushing water can be dangerous. Deep water can sweep your vehicle downstream and you and your passengers could drown. If it is only shallow water, it can still wash away the ground from under your...
Driving in Mud, Sand, Snow, or Ice      Use a low gear when driving in mud – the deeper the mud, the lower the gear. Keep the vehicle moving to avoid getting stuck. Traction changes when driving on sand. On loose sand, such as on beaches or sand dunes, the tires...
Driving on Hills      Driving safely on hills requires good judgment and an understanding of what the vehicle can and cannot do. WARNING If the vehicle has the two-speed automatic transfer case, shifting the transfer case to N (Neutral) can...